Science, Technology and Education News from Taiwan

Vous retrouvez ces informations, ainsi que d'autres lettres électroniques, dans le site www.swisstalents.org/enews. Il est possible de s'abonner à ces diverses publications.

 
Archives : 2013 - 2012 - 2011 - 2010 - 2009 - 2008
       
N° 03 Mars 2014 6 p.  239 kb
 

Simon Chang, head of the newly formed Ministry of Science and Technology, said his ministry will make good use of Taiwan's financial and human resources and serve as a catalyst for Taiwan's technology development. The ministry's policies will focus on encouraging research and innovation, strengthening the connection between academia and industry, and fostering high-caliber personnel in applied research, Chang said. It will also work to bridge the gap between academia and industry, coordinate between technology and humanity, and promote the application of technology in the cultural and creative industries, he said. As part of its efforts to achieve those goals, Chang told, the ministry will set up two advisory panels on academic research and academia-industry relationship, which will be headed respectively by Academia Sinica President Wong Chi-huey and National Taiwan University professor C.K. Lee. The Ministry of Science and Technology is established on the basis of the former National Science Council. Chang had served as a minister without portfolio and head of Google Asia-Pacific hardware operations before assuming the new position.

A Taiwan physicist is among a US research team that reported the first direct evidence of cosmic inflation. Cosmic inflation is the theory that the universe expanded extremely quickly in the first fraction of a nanosecond after it was born -- the big bang. Kuo Chao-lin is a co-leader of the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization 2 in the South Pole. Kuo is scheduled to return to his alma mater, National Taiwan University, as a visiting scholar between April and June.

National Chiao Tung University develops a chip to detect and control seizures: Taiwan has over 200,000 people suffering from epilepsy, about a third of which cannot be treated through medication alone. To help them and others afflicted with this dangerous condition, a research team from National Chiao Tung University has developed a chip that can be implanted in the brain to detect and suppress seizures. The chip is unique for both its success rate and its externally charged power source. This small chip comes encased in titanium and is designed to be permanently implanted into the human skull. The procedure does not require major surgery or medication, and it can allow for the detection and inhibition of epileptic shock within 0.8 seconds. It has a 92 % success rate. Human trials are expected to begin in three years, with success leading to more clinical trials.

   
N° 02 Février 2014 6 p.  450 kb
 

Research and development expenditures in Taiwan reached NT$431.3 bio. (US$14.4 billion) in 2012 (up 4.4 % from 2011), accounting for 3.06 % of the Taiwan's gross domestic product (GDP) for that year. This marked the 2nd consecutive year in which R&D spending topped 3 % of GDP, the Directorate General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics (DGBAS) said. 75 % of the R&D spending took place in the business sector, and 24.8 % in the government sector. The rest was in the higher education and non-profit sectors, the DGBAS said. In terms of research type, spending on technological development accounted for the largest portion, at 67 %. In terms of research field, the majority -- 76 % -- was related to engineering. There were 179,000 R&D personnel in 2012, up 2.9 % from the previous year. The number of female R&D employees increased by 3.9 %, higher than for males, at 2.6 %.

The Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) of Taiwan and Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. of Japan announced that they are collaborating in the field of disaster prevention to develop autonomous sensor-network technology that can communicate information between devices without human intervention. The focus of the research collaboration is the application of disaster-prevention systems that use autonomous sensor-network technology. ITRI and Fujitsu Laboratories will work to develop technologies that will collect environmental data from a wide-area grid through numerous wireless sensors that are linked, so that even if some are knocked offline due to damage or insufficient power, the system as a whole can continue to operate. The partners are also constructing a test system, which will be field tested, for disaster mitigation and prevention that targets landslides and avalanches.

Moreover, ITRI is formally launching Asia's first globally recognized and certified Power Module Testing Laboratory, which will provide related industries a variety of customized service and offer testing and validation for domestic and foreign manufacturers seeking quick access to global markets. Dr. CT Liu, VP and General Director of ITRI’s Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, said that based on a survey by Japan’s Yano Research, the power electronics market will be worth an estimated US$29.01 billion by 2020. As ITRI entered into development of high-efficiency power electronics modules since several years ago, it has developed several collaboration projects with domestic train industry, including Taiwan High Speed Rail as well as the Taiwan Railway and Transit Authority and helped them to develop high-power motor drivers for rail transportation system that will allow trains to instantly accelerate and steadily control current and improve the stability and reliability of motors inside trains. The laboratory has been certified by the Taiwan Accreditation Foundation (TAF) as a neutral communication and service platform and is Asia's first internationally certified power module testing platform to provide testing services to domestic and international manufacturers. The laboratory will help domestic power electronics manufacturers enter markets for smart grid, solar, electric car and smart home applications by accelerating the localization of power modules.

 

   
N° 01 Janvier 2014 5 p.  110 kb
 

Taiwan was ranked No.1 for patent activity in the latest innovation index published by Bloomberg. According to the index, the country’s ranking took into account resident patent filings per 1 million residents and per US$1 million of R&D spent, as well as patents granted as a percentage of the world total. Taiwan was also listed among the top 10 countries for innovation, finishing second in two of the seven categories: high-tech density and tertiary efficiency. The top three nations overall for innovation were South Korea, Sweden and the U.S. More than 200 countries and sovereign regions were assessed in compiling the index.

The 10 "Most Innovative in the World 2014: Countries"; Bloomberg

Rank

Country

Total score

R&D intensity rank

Manufacturing capability rank

Productivity rank

High-tech density rank

Tertiary efficiency rank

Researcher concentration rank

Patent activity rank

1

South Korea

92.10

3

2

33

3

3

6

2

2

Sweden

90.80

4

22

7

5

13

8

26

3

United States

90.69

10

24

10

1

37

12

5

4

Japan

90.41

5

6

14

8

30

9

3

5

Germany

88.23

9

3

20

6

25

17

6

6

Denmark

86.97

6

56

6

17

27

3

14

7

Singapore

86.07

17

14

15

14

24

4

34

8

Switzerland

86.02

8

16

3

9

35

22

29

9

Finland

85.86

2

21

12

32

5

2

15

10

Taiwan

83.52

7

N/A

30

2

2

5

1

Taiwan was ranked No.1 for patent activity in the latest innovation index published by Bloomberg. According to the index, the country’s ranking took into account resident patent filings per 1 million residents and per US$1 million of R&D spent, as well as patents granted as a percentage of the world total. Taiwan was also listed among the top 10 countries for innovation, finishing second in two of the seven categories: high-tech density and tertiary efficiency. The top three nations overall for innovation were South Korea, Sweden and the U.S. More than 200 countries and sovereign regions were assessed in compiling the index.